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Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Early October - Interviews: WRITER + The Dough Rollers

Having previously written a detailed review of Brooklyn band WRITER’s debut LP "Brotherface" (which has been the featured album review at The Deli Magazine since mid-summertime) a full interview by yours truly was conducted with them as well. That interview is now featured here. Additionally, they'll be performing live at The Deli's CMJ Indie Stage at Pianos on Friday October 18th.



Brother act Andy and James Ralph make lyrically observant forcefully percussive buzz bomb guitar rock under the appealing name WRITER. Originally from Southern California the move was made to Brooklyn where the band now calls home. Their debut album “Brotherface” has been met with both critical and listener acclaim since its release last year, and they’re now putting out a new EP called “I Make Neon.” Their sound emphasizes booming drums, layered guitars and voices that are periodically run through some interesting effects. The song “Miss Mermaid” combines all three of those elements adding an otherworldly sheen to it. Other tracks like “Swamp Fire Lake” place emphasis on the kind of swampy delta blues The Kills did so well on their first album. While a track like “Cash For Gold” measures the influence of The Velvet Underground on The Jesus and Mary Chain and processes that through their own sonic filter. Thought provoking lyrics come matched with a solid rhythmic pulse.



Q: The leadoff track from your “Brotherface” album - “Head to Toe” alludes to the “ghost train” metaphor and finishes with the lyrics “don’t you tell me I’m seeing things.” Is this story based on some dreams or visions you had?

A: The story is based on an overnight train I took from Paris to Italy. I stayed in a some really strange dreams. The next day the train conductor woke me up. All my bunkmates were gone and the long train like I remembered was now the only car sitting in the station. I’m still not too sure what that was all about.

Q: The configuration of voices, drums, raw guitars and how the songs are delivered on “Brotherface” share some similarities with a band like The Black Keys. Do you bristle at this sort of comparison, or are totally cool with it?

A: I’m unsure what to say or what to think when that comparison is brought up. Aren’t the Black Keys a contemporary Blues Pop two piece? Truthfully I don’t own any of their records or listen to them at all, except for when I’m scanning the radio. I think it must be the duo aspect: two white guys making a lot of noise. I wonder if the dudes in Japandroids or the dudes in JEFF the Brotherhood get compared to the Black Keys?





Q: A key lyric to your track “Hot Days” goes “please stop, they’re not for real,” which begs the question - what exactly needs to be stopped and isn’t for real?

A: “Hot Days” is about just that… it’s balls hot outside and you’re stuck in your apartment sitting in front of the AC with a friend. The you start to hallucinate. Your friend wants to cool off so he takes a drink of that nasty California tap water. Then he starts mutating and growing extra arms, and all you can do is tell him to stop, don’t trip, they’re not for real. All the songs on Brotherface are strictly based off of moments or fragments we’ve experienced. The music video for Hot Days was filmed in Joshua Tree, California… it was blazing hot that day we filmed it. We carried our gear all over the desert sweating our asses off, kind of fitting.

Q: Lyrically “Miss Mermaid” comes as titled, with references to both east and west coast versions. Here in New York we have the massive Mermaid Parade in mid June out at Coney Island. Is there a California equivalent of this?

A: The boardwalk in Venice Beach sometimes reminds me of the Mermaid Parade out in Coney Island. It’s a community of interesting freaks and spectacular hippies right there on the beach. However the song Miss Mermaid is about a bartender in San Diego who would drown us in alcohol. The bar had a great mural on the outside of a giant octopus attacking a pirate ship and several mermaids swimming to their rescue.


 
Q: Your most recent work is the “I Make Neon” release. Listening to the track “I.E” you can hear how the sound has evolved and is dynamically bigger. More guitar layers, buzzy and full. More additional melody lines The vocals now seem more closely aligned with another brother act – the legendary Jesus & Mary Chain. Would you consider yourselves fans of this band, or the sound that the era they produced their most significant works, the 1990’s of particular interest to you?

A: Yeah, we’re into The Jesus and Mary Chain as well as a lot of the music that was created in the 90’s. The “I Make Neon (7in) is on a record label called Nineteen98. The record label was started in Brooklyn by Travis Trevisan from Tape Deck Mountain. He really likes Grunge and Shoegaze music so his label wants to promote bands that share a 90’s sound and vibe.




Q: It has been noted that Andy is an artist who makes installation sculptures. Who are some of the visual artists that you most admire?

A: The artwork of Los Angeles artist Chris Burden throughout his whole career has always pushed what I was doing just that much further. In the 70’s he was doing wacked out performance art like getting shot in the arm or getting crucified to the hood of a Volkswagen Bug. I get my performance fix from the band but relate more to Burden’s later work like the “Urban Light“ installed out front of the LACMA.


Check out much additional content on this band Here

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The WRITER Equipment and Recording Interview

- How much of your recording is done at home versus in the studio?

Sometimes the drums are tracked in a studio.... a studio with more mics and gadgets. Usually what we do is find a room that we like and we end up recording the entire project there. These rooms end up making the sound of the project unique and individual. In the past the mix and master is always done in a studio. We love working with Mike Kamoo at Earthling Studios in San Diego California.

- What are the pieces of equipment that you find particularly inspiring when recording at home?

It would be our Tascam 4 track machine which Brotherface was recorded through. We used it to track the drums to tape cassette. Then we ran everything else through it’s crunchy preamps.

 - If you use a studio, what do you record there and what do you record by yourself and why?

The only time we use a studio to track in is when it’s been offered to us. Usually a buddy or some who digs the band. We’ve set up our own studio in an old pharmaceutical building in Brooklyn where we can record our projects on our own.

- What one piece of hardware/software would you most like to add to your recording setup (cost not an issue)? Why?

An old beat to hell Neumann U87 would be nice, but Sure mics have never done us wrong. We’ve used the Neumann before and it always captures the sound perfect and adds its own warmth.

 - Do you expect your next record to be self-produced, or would you like to work with a producer? If it’s the latter, who would you most like to produce your band, and why?

We recorded two new tracks for our upcoming release “I Make Neon” with Paul Kostabi at his studio in upstate New York called Thunderdome. We would love to do a full record with him producing and recording the songs.




 - Do you use rack effects or guitar pedals to forge your own sound? If you do, please list the ones you use the most and explain why you love them.

Guitar Pedals: Tim, Ibanez DE7, Guyatone VT3, Danelectro T-Bone, Electro Harmonix Bass Micro Synth, Ibanez TS9, Boss DD20 (vocals), Boss RT20 (vocals)

- Do you have a particular recording style that you aim for? What techniques do you employ to recreate it?

We love big roomy-slap back SLAMMING drums. So we try hard to find a room that will help facilitate that sound when we go to record.

 - Who determines the direction and style of your recordings?

Both of the Brothers Ralph. Or sometimes anyone who’s in the room with us.

 - Is there a person outside the band that's been important in perfecting your recorded or live sound?

Not really one person. Several: Mike Kammo (Earthling Studios), Paul Ramund (Light Vision), Keith Milgaten (Jamuel Saxon), Travis Trevisan (Tape Deck Mountain), Cory Stier (Soda Bar), and Paul Kostabi (Thunderdome) - What other artists would you say have had the biggest influence in your approach to recording? Why? John Bauman’s big roomy drums, Salems witchhouse fuzz, and Neil Young’s score of the film Dead Man for it’s jangly guitars.

 - Would you say that your live show informs your recording process or that your recording process informs your live show? Both? Neither?

Both. It’s a challenge to perform as a two piece. Every note and every beat is important and always heard. So it always varies from show to show in a good way, yet the recording can act as the immortalized proper documentation of the song.

- Is there a piece of equipment that you find particularly useful on stage?

The combination of a Yamaha Portasound PS400, Electro Harmonix Bass Micro Synth, Ampeg bass rig, and Fender Super Reverb creates the right low end fuzz we need. If anything is missing in this chain we’re fucked!




- With bands doing more of everything themselves these days (recording, performing, self-promoting, etc.) and the evermore multimedia nature of the world, how much effort do you put into the visual component of your band - fashion, styling, photography, graphic/web design, etc.? Do you do these things yourself or is there someone that the band works with?

We've worked with a couple really talented friends that have assisted us to make our visual ideas happen. These artist are amazing: Charles Bergquist, E Lee Smith, Lindsay Preston, Erika Ochoa, Andrew Burns, Paul Ramund, and Armando DeLatori

- What do you find to be the most challenging aspects of the recording process? On the flipside, what aspects are the most rewarding?

The most challenging aspect of recording is finding and committing to the right tones because once they are documented we want to be able to produce the same tones in our live set. Tones that are etched in wood or marble. Tones that are here to stay. This is the most challenging aspect but can also be the most rewarding.

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Read the WRITER "Brotherface" album review Here

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The Dough Rollers

Soulful Blues Rock


Having first started out as a duo focusing on a sparser acoustic sound, The Dough Rollers now find themselves expanded to a full time quartet. Founding members Malcolm Ford and Jack Byrne have added the rhythm section of Kyle Olson and Josh Barocas, giving the band more power and force to an already creative songwriting process. The recently released track “Little Lily” taps into a late 1960’s and early 1970’s blues rock feel. Those familiar with the work of Steve Marriott and Humble Pie, Rick Derringer, Johnny and Edgar Winter and Leslie West’s Mountain will recognize kindred spirits here.


Q: “Little Lily” has got a great early 1970’s rock’n’blooze sound. I don’t hear any other bands these days pursuing this avenue of sound. What brought you to focus on this particular style of rock?

Jack Byrne: Not sure really. I think that things have progressed pretty naturally for us. I mean when we started out it was just me and Malcolm and we were just fucking around playing the songs we liked to listen to. Then by the time it was really a band I think we both realized pretty quickly that we wouldn't be happy just doing covers of old blues and country songs, playing one kind of music for the rest of time. So this sound that we have now is just kind of what happened when all of our influences got mashed up into a rock band. Especially once Josh and Kyle entered the picture.

Malcolm Ford: Yea, I don't think that we were necessarily brought here by something. I'd say often times we just play what we like, so I guess in that way we've been pretty impulsive.

Kyle Olson: For me, it's just kind of been the natural progression of all of our musical relationships with each other. Personally I've always been into music that puts feel first - something more visceral, and something that isn't satisfied by most "indie" rock that I've come across.




Q: Do you feel the late 1960’s early 70’s British Blues can be a relevant sound in this day and age?

JB: Not to sound like a douche about it but I think that all music can be a relevant sound in this day and age or in any other one, as long as its good, honest music that people can connect with. You know its not like we sat down one day and said let's throw some 60's British blues band sounds into the mix. I think its more that we've been pretty heavily influenced by a lot of the same sounds that were influencing those English bands of the 60's and a lot of other people for that matter - because it's that kind of genuine, straight-up music that people can easily connect with and have been connecting with since way before we were born. But just like a lot of those 60's bands we're just a few corny white dudes who probably have their amps turned up too high.

MF: For sure. I really feel like there is a place for all music not matter what kind or what year it is as long as it's something that a person could throw on and find something to identify with.

KO: I think a lot people around have grown up with that kind of music - either because of their parents, the internet or because they were kids back then - whatever it might be. Maybe it's just kind of instilled in us at this point? I don't know. There is definitely something to be said for nostalgia but also something to be said for real, raw music that gets up in your guts and soul.

Josh: For me, I definitely enjoy the few blues tunes we have left it our set and I think that music has a lot of power. But I really feel like when it's played right, any music can have that same power and relevance.

Q: You had previously explored a sound more rooted in country and delta blues music. What were the motivating factors in stepping over into a more hyper-rock-blues based sound?

MF: I guess a big one was a few years ago we got the call to go out on tour with Queens of the Stone Age. Before that it had been just Jack and I with acoustic guitars and maybe the odd small amp thrown in there every now and then. When we got that call I guess we just kind of felt like in order to really move that crowd we'd have to turn up. It worked pretty well and then we just kind of fell into a groove of writing songs for a rock band setup and just stuck with it.

JB: And it's a good thing we did change because I don't think we would have gotten the same response out of those crowds had it been just the two of us. When we toured with Bob Dylan a few years ago we did it as a duo and it worked great but I think that the people going to see Queens are a little different than the old guys in cargo shorts and visors at Dylan shows. It's definitely something we had discussed and explored a little right before those Queens tours also but we were kind of struggling with what the sound would be and also just kind of scared to commit to it. And I think that once we kind of just let it come naturally and did commit, it's like the flood gates were opened. I realized that we were never gonna be happy sticking to just one thing and we started exploring all different kinds of sounds - which is something we're still doing and hopefully will continue to do for as long as we can.

Josh: I wasn't in the band yet back then but I feel like, and especially musically, change is always nice. I feel like we've been developing in the direction of increasing relevance to modern sound.

KO: A lot of it is also just literally what comes out when we start writing. Because we all love certain sounds and are attracted to certain ideas. In a way, I guess it's like asking a person with an accent why they have one - it is just what naturally comes out based on your surroundings and role models. We're just trying to make the music that excites us the most.


Q: How did you come to be involved with Jack White's Third Man Records?

JB: When we were on the Queens tour we played in Nashville at the Ryman and wound up meeting him after the show. Then a couple years later we got a call to go down there and make a record. Needless to say we were all really excited. Getting to work with all the people down there at Third Man has really been just such a great experience.

MF: We also have some mutual friends....

KO: Nicest people for real. They've been great to us.

Josh: I second that emotion.

Q: It has been noted that at least one of you play many instruments. What is the one instrument that you cannot presently play, that you would like to?

JB: Has it? I'd be happy enough to be able to play any instrument well.

Josh: Piccolo - no, didgeridoo

MF: I really wish I could play the piano. We can all play a few different things but not necessarily very well though.

KO: Cello or double bass. Bowed strings are the only acoustic instrument with manual control over sustain. I like it deeper. That sounded kind weird and serious didn't it?


Q: Are The Dough Rollers now prepared to play big electric rock shows from this point forward? Are the more intimate settings now put aside for this other musical vision?

JB: Not really sure what you mean. Isn't that what most people in bands want? We've been lucky enough to just kind of get thrown into the thing of playing bigger shows because of some of the tours we've been on. So kind of like a sink or swim type of deal. I think there are definitely ups and downs to both intimate settings and the bigger shows but if by "putting aside this other musical vision" you mean we're not going to do the duo thing anymore, then yea I guess we're just exploring new avenues now. Who wants to do the same thing forever anyway?

Josh: It's nice to play our local haunts and stuff you know? But hopefully we'll be taking this show on the road to some pretty soon.

MF: At the end of the day I guess we just like to play. We're happy to be playing no matter what the venue is. Obviously it's always great to play for a big audience but that doesn't mean there isn't something to be said for the intimacy of a smaller venue.

KO: That sounds like the goal of any band. But of course we're ready. We're continuing to write new material and develop our sound - now we're just getting out and trying them in front of people. The one thing I really care about is places with good sound so that people can really hear and understand it for what it is instead of a bunch of feedback and a shitty mix.

Significant Links and Facts:





Origins: Malcolm is from California and all over, Jack and Josh from New York and Kyle from Minnesota.

What it is:

JB: Somewhere between rock, r and b, blues and country. Maybe other shit too? Just everything we like to listen to rolled into a not very neat package.

MF: Biker-soul?

Josh: Aggressive-jam?

KO: Question mark music.

For those who like: (names of bands that play a similar genre)

MF: Shit dunno. Creedence?

JB: Yea Cream, Zeppelin. Any of those. Not that we sound like them or are trying to but I think we're coming from similar places.

Josh: There are definitely bands that have gotten big recently that are coming from those places too. Third Man has been great about putting this stuff out. Bands like Alabama Shakes, Jeff the Brotherhood. Not really sure but I think it's coming from many of the same places.

KO: Corny white dudes rocking? Also to me, a lot of the Daptone records stuff seems to be pretty in-line with some of the things we do.

Relevant info:

JB: We're really excited about our single "Little Lily" that came out on Third Man Records.

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The Dough Rollers Equipment and Recording Interview

- How much of your recording is done at home versus in the studio?

JB: I guess it's been split pretty evenly though I think we used to record at home a lot more though.

MF: Yea when it was just the two of us it was really easy to just set up a mic or two and record.

- What are the pieces of equipment that you find particularly inspiring when recording at home?

JB: Probably Malcolm's Tascam 388. It was a really nice machine.

MF: Yea I miss that thing. It was awesome. Quarter inch 8 track. It was really fun to fuck around with. We're gonna get another one soon.

- If you use a studio, what do you record there and what do you record by yourself and why?

JB: I guess it just depends on the timing. Obviously if we could we always be in a studio recording straight to tape with real engineers and shit. Like Malcolm said before though it was really easy for us to record acoustic at home when we played as duo and a lot of the time we'd find ourselves really happy with the sounds we were able to come up with at home.

KO: Yea that's true. I don't think we start out before recording a song saying "this has to recorded here or there," it just kind of depends on when we get the opportunity and when we have the right material to record.

- What one piece of hardware/software would you most like to add to your recording setup (cost not an issue)? Why?

JB: The REDD Consoles from EMI? That's what all the Beatles stuff at Abbey Road was recorded on. I want one because Lenny Kravitz has one....

MF: Or a Fairchild 660 or 670 Compressor / Limiter. Same with the REDD consoles, these are the sounds that people have been trying to recreate over and over again for years. I guess the dream would be to have that original sound and because Lenny Kravitz has one.

Josh: I've been thinking about some Moogs lately too...


- Do you expect your next record to be self-produced, or would you like to work with a producer? If it’s the latter, who would you most like to produce your band, and why?

JB: I mean I guess the dream is to be in a real studio and have the know how and the opportunity to produce it yourself. But it's also really nice to work with a good producer who can bring their own influences and ideas to the table. Ideally I think a producer should be able to transplant his ideas into you and make you think that his ideas are your own.

KO: Hopefully next time we'll be in the studio with a producer. I'm not sure who though. It was really great getting to work with Jack White and everybody at Third Man Records.

MF: Yea I mean it's fun to do stuff at home and all but I think we all agree that we're hoping next time is with a good producer. Not sure who though.

- Do you use rack effects or guitar pedals to forge your own sound?

JB: I use anything that I think sounds good or could sound right in a certain context. Whether that's just the sound of good pickups going straight into a good amp or a wall of pedals or whatever it might be, I guess that just depends. I don't discriminate though. There are definitely things that are mainstays of my setup but if I told you exactly what they were, well needless to say I'd probably have to kill you. Just kidding - kind of. Boxes I've loved over the years have been the Sola Sound Tone Bender, the Dallas Rangemaster. I have a great Leslie simulator but I actually can't remember what it's called. Dave Fox at FoxRox Electronics has been making some really great shit for years. Actually almost everything he makes is great. When I was in 7th grade one of my first pedals ever, actually I think it was my first, was a FoxRox Captain Coconut II. I lost my mind for that thing. It had the Octave, Univibe and Fuzz all in one massive pedal. To me back then, when I played it, it sounded exactly like Jimi Hendrix. I think I still have it sitting around somewhere. Prescription Electronics also makes some really stuff.

Josh: I've been really getting into using my Big Muff lately.

- Do you have a particular recording style that you aim for? What techniques do you employ to recreate it?

JB: I think we all like things to be as live as possible while still having opportunity if we want it to really explore creative avenues with the recording process. We usually spend a lot of time with things before we record them so that we can record as much of track live as we want to.

MF: In my mind I guess it's kind of like, keep things as recognizable as possible while also not having it sound completely recycled.

KO: Yea in that respect I feel like we're really open to any style of recording. Because what's the point of just trying to do one particular thing over and over again? That sounds boring...

- Who determines the direction and style of your recordings?

JB: We all do. We don't go into anything saying we want it to sound like something else or that we want it to really be in a specific style. Quality is the main priority though. Things are just kind of determined by how we're all feeling at the time.

MF: For sure. Its our style you know what i mean? Shit happens naturally through us playing not by sitting around and talking about what direction or style we want to take certain tunes into.


- Is there a person outside the band that's been important in perfecting your recorded or live sound?

MF: Our friend Elvis Perkins has definitely been a big influence as far as recording goes.

JB: Yep. And as far as live - I mean getting to tour with Bob Dylan and then Queens of the Stone Age. Those were pretty pivotal moments. Especially being on tour with a band like Queens, who are so incredible live. I think that really gave us the wake up call we needed. Oh and our friend Dikayl Rimmasch has recently been really important for us in developing our live and recorded sound.

Josh: Even just our short time at Third Man was very influential for recorded sounds as well.

- What other artists would you say have had the biggest influence in your approach to recording? Why?

JB: Shit I don't know. Can I say just anybody who's ever recorded a good sounding song? We all love Phil Spector, a lot of the things that were coming out of Stax and Muscle Shoals in the 60's and early 70's. I love the production on the early Funkadelic albums. Glyn and Andy Johns have also done some really incredible stuff for recording in general.

MF: Yea I mean what can you say? The Beatles? I really like a lot of Joe Meek's stuff as well. I'm also a huge fan of Jimmy Page's production on a lot of the Zeppelin stuff.

KO: The early Impressions albums that were worked on by Johnny Pate, Donny Hathaway and co. are pretty amazing. The sound is just there you know? Also the Al Green stuff that came out on Hi Records in the late 60's and early 70's.

- Would you say that your live show informs your recording process or that your recording process informs your live show? Both? Neither?

JB: I don't know. It works both ways for sure. There are times when we know we're going into the studio and a song isn't quite there yet so we spend an enormous amount of time workshopping it until we're satisfied - so in a way I guess the recording process does inform the live show but I think for the most part things are developed by testing them out live. Usually if something doesn't work we'll either break it down for parts or scrap it altogether.

- Is there a piece of equipment that you find particularly useful on stage?

JB: Gibson guitars? My amp?

MF: Fender guitars?

Josh: Beer?

KO: My hat?


- With bands doing more of everything themselves these days (recording, performing, self-promoting, etc.) and the evermore multimedia nature of the world, how much effort do you put into the visual component of your band - fashion, styling, photography, graphic/web design, etc.? Do you do these things yourself or is there someone that the band works with?

JB: Its an interesting time you know? I mean back in the old days there were people who worked at labels whose jobs it was to do stuff like that for bands. Now so much of it is up to the band. Certain things just can't be ignored if you're trying to build an image or a brand or whatever. So we do think about it to an extent and we also have people who help us with the shit we're not good at.

MF: I think you have to strike a nice balance between not thinking about it too much and obsessing over things. It's not like we're gonna come out in crazy outfits or anything, we just wear what's comfortable but a certain amount of thought does have to be put into how you want to present yourself while still having it be natural.

- What do you find to be the most challenging aspects of the recording process? On the flipside, what aspects are the most rewarding?

JB: Sometimes you just have to deal with what you think is losing performance value for something that's exactly right. So that's kind of a drag but it's just part the process. For me the most rewarding aspect is I guess really the whole process leading up to the actual recording of a song. Breaking it down, workshopping etc....

MF: I'd say the most rewarding aspect is when there's not a ten foot gap in between the stage and the audience at a show. Then you know you're doing something right with the recording.

Josh: It's all downhill after the first take.

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An edited version of this interview can be found at The Deli Magazine site Here

and in Print Magazine Issue No. 35 Here

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10 comments:

NYCDreamin said...

Great introductions as always to a very diverse sounding pair of bands. I think I'd be more apt to listen to The Dough Rollers as their style is a bit more up my alley than Writer, although I can hear some Suicide influences there, even if they're unaware of it themselves. It is always a bit weird for me to read that someone is influenced by music from the 90's...I guess I'm getting old!

I really like the more detailed "studio and recording" sections near the end of each piece - sometimes that kind of technical info gets overlooked in favor of more "interesting" questions but for the people who really love the music it's cool to know how those sounds are being created.

DaveCromwell said...

For sure the band WRITER is definitely more 'psych rock' (which I love) and The Dough Rollers more of that Zepplin-y styles 'blues rock.' Two of my fave styles of rock, actually!

I'm glad to hear you enjoy the equipment and recording portions, NYCDreamin. I realize those questions lean more towards the technical aspect of making music, but for those interested, it's important to get that info out there.

Anouk vdM said...

Great review

William said...

nice stuff- bit more bluesy than usual which is cool- some interesting stuff- im sure they'll both do well - and obviously helps to have friends like jack white! either way sweet tunes

The Midnite Rambler said...

I hope we'll be hearing more from Writer. They moved from SoCal to Brooklyn - are they insane?? Ok we all know crazy people make great music. Thanks for introducing them for us.

DaveCromwell said...

Certainly the blues influences of Dough Rollers and psych-rock sounds of WRITER are each of those respective bands calling cards. I spend more than my fair share of time listening to both genres. Happy to make the introduction for each of these respective bands.

Patricia Mena said...

Very nice interview Dave. Interesting bands.

DaveCromwell said...

Glad you like, Patricia. I know its a lot to read. What I do (constantly, actually) when I run across something interesting but lengthy on the web - is I print it out and read it carefully at my leisure. You really benefit from that kind of studious observation.

Or - you can just click on the audio link and let your ears do all the work. ;-)

Mirror said...

Steve wrote:
Atta Boy! Ride that wordsmithin' wave!

DaveCromwell said...

Whether I ride the "new wave" or the "wave of multilation" like Black Francis - the 'smith' of words could come from as prolific inspirations as The Cure's Robert Smith (or even *The Smiths* themselves!). But - as the band Missing Persons once asked - "what are words for? When when no one listens anymore. It's no use talkin at all."
Well - hopefully that's not the case here.